Home » Microbial status of Kenyan herbal products available for HIV infected individuals. by Lydia K Kaume
Microbial status of Kenyan herbal products available for HIV infected individuals. Lydia K Kaume

Microbial status of Kenyan herbal products available for HIV infected individuals.

Lydia K Kaume

Published
ISBN : 9780549824350
ebook
47 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Herbal products are the fastest growing modality of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in both developed and developing nations. The use of herbal products is significant among HIV/AIDS patients even with many reports of contaminants and adverseMoreHerbal products are the fastest growing modality of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in both developed and developing nations. The use of herbal products is significant among HIV/AIDS patients even with many reports of contaminants and adverse events associated with their use. There is no legislative criterion governing the microbiological quality of herbal products despite the large number of herbalists and herbal shops located all over Kenya, therefore microbiological evaluation of herbal products marketed to HIV infected individuals is necessary. A total of 44 herbal products were purchased from 15 locations in Nairobi, Kenya and screened for aerobic plate count, coliform count, Escherichia coli count, Staphylococcus aureus count, and yeast and mold count. Methods and procedures used were consisted with the American Public Health Associations Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods, 3rd Edition, and the Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual, 8 th Edition-Revision-A. The plate count means ranged from 1.5 x 101 cfu/g to 7.1 x 108 cfu/g for aerobic plate count, est. <10 cfu/g to 3 x 106 cfu/g for coliform, est. <10 cfu/g to 5 x 101 cfu/g for E. coli, and est. <10 cfu/g to 2.5 x 10 3 cfu/g for S. aureus. Yeast and mold count means ranged from est. <10 cfu/g to 9 x 104 cfu/g. Results show that 75% of the herbal samples failed to meet the microbial contamination limits set by the W.H.O. and U.S. Pharmacopoeia. The results of this study suggest that establishing quality control measures and decontamination procedures is necessary as herbal products may serve as a major source of infection to HIV infected individuals and other users with suppressed immune functions.